MANY MERITS ARE SQUASHED INTO… SQUASH!

LET’S TALK NUTRITION
WITH IRÈNE ROLFO,
NUTRITION MANAGER AND DIETICIAN

“A small gesture for good health and for the environment…

 

Squash grow very well in our region and are harvested when ripe, from late summer through winter. The term “squash” refers to several species of plant in the Cucurbitaceae family. We consume these fruits — often prepared as vegetables — and their oleaginous seeds which, when grilled, bring a creative touch to salads, soups, gratins, pies, and bread dough. Their flowers are edible and delicious fried in batter, and the skin of the ambercup squash almost disappears when cooked.

From the same family, among others, we find: winter squash, pumpkins, spaghetti squash, and ambercup squash. Surprisingly, they are eaten in both savory and sweet dishes: soups, gratins, pies, cakes, etc.

 

Due to their water content, squash are low in calories (20 kcal / 100 gm). The deeper the color orange, the richer the beta-carotene (vitamin A) with anti-oxidant properties.  They are full of vitamins B and C, and minerals such as potassium, manganese, and copper.

Their fiber is kind to sensitive intestines.

They have the advantage of keeping for a long time at maturity. Kept whole, a cool and dry place is enough for them — no unnecessary packaging. Once cut, they can be stored in the vegetable drawer of a refrigerator.

A good knife, a little patience, and a lot of care are key to preparing squash. Rinse and dry before either peeling them or using their husks to make a serving dish. Broth, or chips made from their peels, highlight squash as an ideal element in our environment, since every single bit is consumable – leaving “zero waste” — and their shapes and colors, in their own way, make up for the season’s lack of light.”